65 years of serving children and families

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Lynn office:   176 Franklin St.
Phone: 781-593-2727
 
Salem office:   275 Lafayette St.
Phone: 978-744-7037
 

Aspire Developmental Services will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender or gender identity, age, religion, marital status, familial status, sexual orientation, ancestry, public assistance, veteran history/military status, genetic information or disability.

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Our

History

Our History

History of Aspire

Founded in 1951 as the Cerebral Palsy Council of the North Shore, Aspire Developmental Services, Inc. is a private, nonprofit healthcare and educational agency that provides programs for children and adults with physical and developmental disabilities as well as their families. It has undergone three name changes and a significant shift in the scope of the services it provides in its 65-year history.

 

The agency was organized by parents and professionals interested in providing services for persons with cerebral palsy. They incorporated on Feb.16, 1951 as the Cerebral Palsy Council of the North Shore, Inc. The agency operated as United Cerebral Palsy Association of the North Shore, Inc. from May 1, 1952 to Dec. 4, 2001. The name was changed on Dec. 21, 2001 to Cerebral Palsy Association of Eastern Massachusetts, Inc. In 2015, the name was changed to Aspire Developmental Services, Inc.

 

More change is on the way as the agency will move its Lynn headquarters from Johnson Street to the former O’Keefe School at 176 Franklin St. as it seeks to increase its capacity to serve North Shore children with developmental needs and their families.

 

Aspire, which also has a Salem location, provided services to 1,856 children in 10 communities in 2015 through Early Intervention, Early Support and its Aspire Early Education Center, which is open to typically developing children and those with mild developmental delays. Early Intervention referrals were up 28 percent from the previous year.

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